Amelie Gallery

Composition of Cornfield
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 
Trail to the Mountain Spring
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 
Abstraction of Green Landscape
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 

River Side Landscape No.1
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2011

Mirror Image of the Mountain
Oil on Canvas
150x180cm
2011

Mountains No.9

Oil on Canvas
150x180cm

Wind, Rain & Cloud
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 
Meditations at Dusk
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 
Vertical Mountain & Horizontal Lake
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012
 

Floating Clouds
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012

Still Water
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012

Snow Lingers
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2012

Autumn Bush
Oil on Canvas
150x180cm
2011
 
White Clouds

Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2011
 
Right Bank
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2011
 

River Side Landscape No.2

Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
2011
 
Wheat Field
Oil on Canvas
80x100cm
 
Mountains No.11
Oil on Canvas
150x180cm
2011
 

Mountains No.7
Oil on Canvas
135x360cm
 
Landscape
Oil on Canvas
120x150cm
 
Mountains No.1
Oil on Canvas
140x160cm
 


Mountains No.4
Oil on Canvas

 
Mountains No.8
Oil on Canvas
150x180cm
   

The forcefulness of Li Xin's work reminds people of the Five Dynasties & Two Songs landscape style embodied in Fan Kuan's masterpiece titled Travelling Through Xishan: a remote, desolate, tranquil and mysterious land like the stillness at the dawn of time. Artist Li Xin's nostalgia seems to reside in a vast cosmos. Lothar Ledderose believes that traditional Chinese landscape painting was an outgrowth of religious landscape art (such as the Mogao Grottoes at Dunhuang) as religious values gradually morphed into aesthetic values and came to influence aesthetic perceptions. The ancients' retreat into the landscape was an act of spiritual awakening and elevation. Li Xin's works transcend specific landscape and have a lofty and solemn atmosphere. In his work Mirror Image of the Mountain, the classic Chinese image form of vertical symmetry turns the mountain into an abstract, primitive totem, profound in its dignity.

The abstraction in Li Xin's Landscape paintings is manifested in his exquisite rendering of the textures of mountains and trees. Here, chains of mountains become the body of the metaphysical spirit, encompassing a vast and relentless internal power. Sometimes the sense of mass is no longer important; the heaviness recedes into the distance with the clamorous uproar, while the solemn and heavy grey tones are brimming with the primordial essence of the mountains and rivers, giving a sense of the bizarre powers of timelessness within the stillness.

Artist:Li Xin(1971~)
Professional Oil Painter.
Member of Chinese Artists Association;

Exhibitions:

1999: The 9th National Art Exhibition;
2003: The 3rd China Oil Painting Exhibition;
2004: The 10th National Art Exhibition;
2005: The 2nd Contemporary Chinese Painting & Oil Painting Landscape Exhibition;
2009: The 11th National Art Exhibition;
2011
Soul of the Land II- The Abstract Aesthetics of Contemporary Landscape Paintings, Amelie Gallery;
ShContemporary,Shang Hai Exhibition Center;
Cold Blood, Amelie Gallery,Beijing.
Zen Encounters in Art,Amelie Gallery,Beijing.
2012:
New Year Fine Art Festival, Shin Kong Place,Beijing.
2012 SH Contemporary, Shang Hai Exhibition Center.
Art Taipei 2012.

Awards:
2006:
Spirit and Character-China Contemporary Oil Painting Exhibition, his work was collected by China Oil Painters Society;
2008:
Bronze Award, 2008 Olympic Fine Arts Exhibition, his work was collected by the Organizing Committee;
2009:
Award Nomination, The 11th National Art Exhibition.


Artist Li Xin on his Paintings
Excerpts of a talk between Li Xin and art critic Mr. Wu Houbin

Inner Peace and Zen
I prefer the state of tranquility, which is reflected in my artworks subconsciously. When dealing with the space on the canvas, I am interested in the dynamic tension hidden in a stationary state, or the preparatory stage before an eruption. Beneath a peaceful surface, the hidden strengths are accumulating, just like the tranquility before a volcano breaks out.

I like travel and introversive meditations, both are important ways for me to strengthen my mind and broaden my horizon. Such practices are similar to the idea of Zen. When I am in the wild field, the natural shifting of the four seasons moves me and triggers a magical resonance within my mind. Such feelings transfer onto the canvas smoothly and naturally.

On traditions of Chinese Landscape Paintings
Chinese ideas like the harmony between man and nature & the unity of heaven and humanity are in my blood. In contrast to the west, Chinese traditional landscape paintings are based on a higher viewpoint in an aim to express infinity in finitude. I love Balthus and Morandi maybe because their works are influenced by eastern arts.

I am longing for the peaceful status of minds of ancient Chinese painters, with their spirits merged with the natural world. Their minds are wide in breadth and clear without abjectness. I am attracted by their artistic spirits and their charming characters. I read Theories of the Song Dynasty Painting from time to time, its sharp arguments and profound insights always inspire me.

Colors and Textures
In my paintings, I would construct large monochrome areas of different brightness with subtle variations in hue. Such arrangements are based on my emotion of the landscape, aiming to eliminate vanity and pursue peaceful and far-reaching images. Usually my brushworks are placid, on top of which I would add textures with some self-invented instruments.

Composition and Rhythm
The composition of my image is subconsciously led by Chinese aesthetics. I believe rhythm is the most significant visual element. Different tendencies of the forces grow out of rhythmic variations, conflict in balance produce the overall impression of the image, thus the external landscape are turned into rational pursuit of the mind.

To start a painting, I would carefully draw several straight lines as the basic structure, usually with repeated experiments. The first line matters the most as it creates the division on the canvas. Then I would add color areas, enriching the rhythm. In this step, brevity is the key to create spatial tension.

The next step is to add textures, which varies but within a unity. Textures would strengthen the existence of the land and also supplement the rhythm. When it comes to the stage of coloring and depicting, I would adjust the composition and rhythm through the representational details of the landscape.